Before you do anything, it’s important to know whether your friend or loved one has an alcohol addiction. Alcohol use disorder, or alcoholism, is more than just drinking too much from time to time. Sometimes alcohol as coping mechanism or social habit may look like alcoholism, but it’s not the same.

Read Choosing Drug Rehab and Addiction Treatment to learn more. Residential treatment or “rehab” facilities provide intensive treatment for alcohol abuse or addiction. Your loved one resides at a special facility for 30 to 90 days and receives treatments such as detox, therapy, and medication. You may be worried that if you bring up your concerns the person https://ecosoberhouse.com/ will get angry, defensive, lash out, or simply deny that they have a problem. Your loved one’s drinking isn’t likely to get better on its own; it’s more likely to get worse until you speak up. Witnessing your loved one’s drinking and the deterioration of your relationship can trigger many distressing emotions, including shame, fear, anger, and self-blame.

Living with Someone Who Has Alcohol Use Disorder

Regardless of the type of support system, it’s helpful to get involved in at least one when getting sober. Sober communities can help someone struggling with alcohol addiction deal with the challenges of sobriety in day-to-day life. Sober communities can also share relatable experiences and offer new, healthy friendships. And these communities make the person with an alcohol addiction accountable and provide a place to turn to if there is a relapse.

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Individuals with alcohol dependence may drink partly to reduce or avoid withdrawal symptoms. Genetic factors make some people especially vulnerable to alcohol dependence. Contrary to myth, being able to “hold your liquor” means you’re probably more at risk — not https://ecosoberhouse.com/article/support-for-those-who-struggling-with-alcohol-addiction/ less — for alcohol problems. Yet a family history of alcohol problems doesn’t mean that children will automatically grow up to have the same problems. Nor does the absence of family drinking problems necessarily protect children from developing these problems.

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Behavioral treatments are aimed at changing drinking behavior through counseling. They are led by health professionals and supported by studies showing they can be beneficial. While only a healthcare provider can diagnose an alcohol use disorder, there are several physical and behavioral signs that may indicate an individual struggles with their alcohol use.